Fly Tying

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Suspender Buzzer, or 'sugar cube'

Written by John Thomson. Posted in Fly Tying

Here we have a retake of the classic cdc emerger it is so simple to tie and takes no special skills  and just the bare minimum of materials, it will kill on any water where fish a broaching to take emergers. so let us start.

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The Tickler 'A Damsel Variant'

Written by John Thomson. Posted in Fly Tying

Here have a very easy to tie Damsel that catches on any water at anytime of the year, it is best fished slow along the bottom with the odd twitch to imitate the natural.

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The Pheasant Tail Nymph

Written by John Thomson. Posted in Fly Tying

The Pheasant Tail Nymph is probably one of the most famous patterns, and one of the most deadly I might add, that has ever been devised, Sawyer seen it's potential and tied his with nothing but copper wire and cock pheasant tail fibres, and nowadays with modern materials these little flies have come into the 21st century with a bang, they are now made with a thorax of many weird and wonderful materials, what has never changed though is the way in which they are tied, until Now...

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Cats Whisker

Written by FishKeep. Posted in Fly Tying

The Cat's Whisker is probably the most consistantly succesful lure for the still water angler. Born in the 1980's and has gone on to spawn many variants. This one being unweighted is better fished on an intermediate or sinking line but can still catch on a floater. Weight can be added in many ways including lead wire, bead head or chainbead eyes. The tools required for this pattern are few, A vice,bobbin holder,scissors and a whip finish tool.  This lure has spawned probably more variants than any other I have come across. Try varying the colours or materials, add jungle cock cheeks for a very effective variant, the choice is yours.

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Diawl Bach (Little Devil)

Written by FishKeep. Posted in Fly Tying

The Diawl Bach originates, as you might have guessed, from Wales and in the Welsh language its name means 'little devil'. The pattern (or one the many variants that have evolved) is often the first choice nymph for the stillwater competition angler - proof enough of it's effectiveness. Although the boat competition anglers will fish it on all densities of line including ultra fast sinkers, it is really a floating line pattern for the bank angler. It can be fished singly or as part of a team and the retrieve should mimic the movement of whatever food items are around. Buzzers are relatively slow moving so the fly should be fished either dead drift on the breeze or with a slow figure of eight retrieve if the fish are feeding on them. Sedge pupae tend to swim rapidly up to the surface so if there are sedges about try fishing it faster with long pulls to make it rise in the water. The olive nymphs tend to swim with a jerky motion so try short pulls with a pause in between whenever pond or lake olives are around.

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